9 Delicious Choices For The Best Tomatoes To Grow In A Container

If you don’t have the space for a large garden, you can still have a bountiful harvest of tomatoes by using containers. You can grow a variety of tomatoes in containers. There are some great options for container gardeners! Growing tomatoes in pots is an easy task, so long as you have strong stakes.

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Brandywine and Cherokee tomatoes are lovely, plump heirloom tomatoes that can handle containers. There are some ornamental tomato options if you want the plant to double as decoration for your patio. Make a selection from these nine best tomatoes to grow in a container. You are sure to get tasty tomatoes to last all season!

If you don’t have the space for a large garden, you can still have a bountiful harvest of tomatoes by using containers. You can grow a variety of tomatoes in containers. There are some great options for container gardeners! Growing tomatoes in pots is an easy task, so long as you have strong stakes.

Brandywine and Cherokee tomatoes are lovely, plump heirloom tomatoes that can handle containers. There are some ornamental tomato options if you want the plant to double as decoration for your patio. Make a selection from these nine best tomatoes to grow in a container. You are sure to get tasty tomatoes to last all season!

1. Brandywine

I had to start off the list with my favorite tomato to grow in a container. Brandywine tomatoes are a beautiful heirloom in a pretty pink to red color. They can be large. I think they are some of the best slicing tomatoes for BLTs and sandwiches.

Something to consider about Brandywine tomatoes is the size of the plants. Some of mine have reached five feet tall. Their roots are massive, so you are going to need a 30-gallon pot to allow them to reach their maximum size and potential. Also, they are going to need a substantial stake and regular pruning.

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Source: bonnieplants.com

2. Cherokee Purple

If you want a beautiful tomato for your container garden, you have to grow at least one Cherokee Purple tomato plant. Cherokee Purple plants originated in Tennessee and ranks as one of the best tasting tomatoes with a sweet, creamy taste. The tomatoes are a purple and red color, as well as large. A medium Cherokee tomato can be up to 12 ounces.

Cherokee plants are bigger and take time to mature. You can expect a full 90 days, at least, for your plant to reach the age of production. In a garden, they need at least 36 inches apart, but they need at least a 30-gallon pot to grow productively.

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Source: bonnieplants.com

3. Sun Gold

While I prefer to grow heirloom tomatoes, every gardener needs to grow a few hybrids. Sun Gold tomatoes are an orange cherry type tomato with a sweet flavor. They grow plentiful on the plants. Most gardeners only need one plant for their family throughout the summer.

If you want to grow Sun Gold tomatoes in containers, you want to look for a pot that is at least 24 inches in diameter. They are going to need to be staked or tall cages; some plants have grown up to ten feet tall! Remember to place these in full sun!

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Source: bonnieplants.com

4. Polish Linguisa

Every gardener needs to have a favorite paste tomato. They are perfect for making large pots of tomato sauce or drying. Paste Tomatoes have a rich flavor and are enormous. On average, they can weigh between 10 ounces and 1 pound. I find Polish Linguisa tomatoes are one of the easiest varieties to grow. They are less prone to blossom end rot.

Polish Linguisa plants are an indeterminate plant, so they will vine. They need plenty of space to extend their roots. When you first plant them, you should plant them deeply and provide them with a deep pot. You can expect the plants to grow around six to seven feet tall that will produce its first fruit in 70 to 75 days.

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Source: burpee.com

5. Wapsipinicon Peach

Wapsipinicon Peach tomatoes are an heirloom variety with a lovely, peachy tone. They are a yellow-orange color, similar to a peach, with fuzzy skin. They are one of the sweetest tomatoes I have tasted. I highly recommended trying them if you want something different than the regular tomato. /

The Wapsipinicon Peach plants are highly productive, producing hundreds of small tomatoes each year. They grow extraordinarily well in containers. I like to keep them on my patio because the color of the tomato makes the plant seem ornamental. They don’t tend to grow haphazardly, so you will find no trouble growing beautiful Wapsipinicon Peach tomatoes.

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Source: rareseeds.com

6. Stupice

Not everyone is blessed enough to live in a warm climate. If you live in a cooler region, the Stupice tomatoes are a great, cold weather tomato. They tend to be one of the earliest heirloom plants. More than likely, they will yield fruit before any of your other varieties.

Stupice tomatoes do very well in containers. They are compact plants that produce small, two inches in diameter, tomatoes. However, you will get an entire season of tomatoes as they are a highly productive species. The fruits are not as sweet as other tomatoes. There isn’t anything amazing about the fruit, but Stupice is ideal for cooler weather.

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Source: burpee.com

7. Japanese Black Trifele

I am particularly a fan of vegetable plants that can double as an ornamental plant in pots. Japanese Black Trifele produces fruits that are pear shaped in a beautiful mahogany color. The color of the fruit makes this plant perfect for decoration as well. It is nice when ornamental plants also play a role in food production!

Another nice feature of the Japanese Black Trifele is that they are a relatively compact plant. One regular stake should provide enough support. You should give these tomatoes a chance. They have a unique flavor – sweet with a hint of smoky flavor - wrapped in a bronze colored tomato.

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Source: orldtomatosociety.com

8. Silvery Fir Tree

Most container gardeners prefer small tomato plants because they require less support and don’t need huge containers for their roots. Silvery Fir Tree tomatoes are another option for you to consider, and they are a compact plant, loved by many container gardeners. They are also ornamental in nature with lovely silvery gray-green leaves. Their unique colors are impressive.

The fruits are mid-sized. Their red color pops against the silver toned leaves. Silvery Fir Tree plants produce around 60 days after planting, so they may be one of your earliest-producing plants.

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Source: staticflickr.com

9. Black Plum

Plum tomatoes are a beautiful option, and most have a roasted flavor. One of my favorite plum tomato varieties is the Black Plum plant. They are an indeterminate plant, meaning a vining tomato. It produces small, two inch tomatoes. Some plants have less productive harvests when in a container. I have never experienced anything but a bountiful harvest from the Black Plum plants.

Black Plum Tomato plants tend to produce within 70 days of planting. They are a juicy tomato, but I love to use them in sauce. Their size makes them less desirable for sandwiches. However, their color makes them a great addition to salads.

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Source: onlytomatoseeds.com

I never select just one variety of tomatoes to grow. My garden overflows with multiple colors, shapes, and sizes of tomatoes. I love my harvest being full of color and providing me with multiple options for use.

I suggest everyone has a paste, thicker tomato for tomato sauces. They provide a less runny sauce, perfect for pizza and pasta. I always have at least one variety of slicing tomato, for sandwiches and burgers. Select a few of these options for the best plants to grow in a container for your garden this year. You will end up having a bountiful harvest full of flavor.

Do you have a favorite tomato to grow in a container? I would love to hear your experience in the comments!

9 Delicious Choices For The Best Tomatoes To Grow In A Container
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Tina Martino
 

My passion is gardening. Along with my husband and children, each year we grow a garden large enough to provide our family of five with over half of our needed produce. Besides vegetables and a small berry patch, I also focus my attention on beautifying our home with strategically placed flowers, herbs, and flowering plants. Gardening is more than just a hobby; it is a way of life.